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Antiques Seekers Crowd the Spring in New Hampshire Antique Show

April 21st, 2013


This tavern table with an oval 35½" x 26½" two-board top has widely splayed legs and tiny feet; it was $2500. The handled tin pot with side pouring spout, all in orange paint and with a label attesting to the fact that it came from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Schorsch, was $1250. Both were offered by Patricia Stauble of Wiscasset, Maine.


Charles M. Guinipero of Pantry Box Antiques, Stafford Springs, Connecticut, is new to the business. We caught him in the midst of setting up on Saturday at his first indoor show. It looked a lot different on Sunday.

Concord, New Hampshire

The size of the crowd that surged into Nan Gurley’s Spring in New Hampshire Antique Show & Sale on Sunday morning,  April 21, surprised some observers. The floor of Concord’s Everett Arena remained busy for the rest of the day too.

All of Concord seemed to be bustling on this April weekend. Motels were full up and restaurants sported unusually long waits for tables. Some reckoned that people wanted to get out of their houses and away from TV sets and computer screens after the drama-filled week that had just ended.

The events that began with bombs exploding at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15, and ended late on Friday night after the death of one of the accused and the capture of the other put an end to five tension-packed days. It’s no wonder that relieved New Englanders were happy to escape from those scenes.

This spring show featured dealers from eight states with the majority from New Hampshire. “We had seventy-five exhibitors who filled eighty-three spaces, and only a couple of dealers said they didn’t do as well as expected,” Nan Gurley said. During the following week, the veteran show manager said, “The exhibitors just loved the building. There are doors on every side of the ice skating rink, and that makes for easy in and out access. Hey, they were all out of there within a half hour of closing.

“As for sales, this was a very successful show. And many dealers sold furniture too. I sold a set of six chairs and another dealer sold a set of four. Yes, they sold furniture and a lot of smalls. A lot of stuff went out the doors on that Sunday.”

Exhibitors appeared to have agreed that the theme of the show would be affordability. There were many pieces priced under $500 and, surprisingly, more than a few exhibitors offered pieces for under $100.

Winter is dead; the bad stuff in Boston is over; now it’s time to buy some antiques. For more information, contact Nan Gurley at (207) 625-3577, or e-mail <nangurley@roadrunner.com>.

Firehouse Antiques, Galena, Maryland, came to Concord with a hoard of gardening objects that came from a fallen-in greenhouse, and most of them dated to the 1940’s. The assorted terra-cotta flowerpots in the box were $2 to $2.50 each, and the pair of yellow-painted watering cans was $250.

Benting & Jarvis Antiques, Barrington, New Hampshire, showed the fancy birdcage, 21" high x 30" across, on a slightly larger base and priced at $1850.

Bill Quinn Antiques, Alna, Maine, showed this rustic Adirondack-type carved cupboard or sideboard, 48" high x 37" wide, in bare wood finish, tagged $875.

Shown by Karen Alexander and Ian McKelvey of South Windham, Connecticut, this low-back Windsor was $395; behind it, partially shown, is a stepback cupboard in olive green paint, 6' tall, $2400.

Cheryl A. Scott of East Derry, New Hampshire, showed this 16" x 20" oil on canvas by Ralph L. Senecal, who was born in Bolton, Ontario, in 1883 and lived mostly in Massachusetts. The painting is titled on the back Greens of Summer. The price was $583.

Pam and Martha Boynton of Groton, Massachusetts, sold some mocha pottery and baskets to retail customers and dealers alike. They were displayed on a 19th-century tavern table with its second coat of red paint that was $2800.


Originally published in the July 2013 issue of Maine Antique Digest. © 2013 Maine Antique Digest

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