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Salt, Pepper, and Sugar Shakers Sell High

M.A.D. staff | July 27th, 2013


Mt. Washington Glass Company fig- or beet-shaped sugar shaker, in cased cranberry with polychrome floral decoration, dating to the fourth quarter of the 19th century, 3 7/8" high. The shaker was in remarkably good condition and came from collection of Richard “Dick” and Mary Ann Krauss of Clyde, Ohio. It sold for $3335 (est. $1000/2000).

At a sale in Mt. Crawford, Virginia, on July 27, Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates sold 841 lots of salt, pepper, and sugar shakers for $192,246. Several brought record prices for their forms. The sale had 1100 registered bidders from 18 countries and was held in held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Glass Salt and Sugar Shaker Club (AGSSSC) in nearby Harrisonburg, Virginia.

The top lot was a Mt. Washington Glass Company fig- or beet-shaped sugar shaker of cased cranberry glass with polychrome floral decoration, dating to the last quarter of the 19th century, 3 7/8" high, that sold for $3335 (includes buyer’s premium). It was estimated at $1000/2000. The shaker, in remarkably good condition and a suitable form for a sugar shaker, came from the collection of Richard “Dick” and Mary Ann Krauss of Clyde, Ohio.

Jeffrey Evans said, “The AGSSSC convention drew over fifty members from all corners of the U.S. from Maine to Florida to California. The club and the auction were covered in the New York Times. Rare and unusual examples brought good prices, with several shakers reaching new record high prices for their forms. Middle-market shakers were soft. The groups of lower-end shakers sold surprisingly well to on-line bidders, suggesting that some new collectors have entered the field.”

 For further details, go to the Web site (www.jeffreysevans.com), e-mail <info@jeffreysevans.com>, or call (540) 434-3939.

This 5 3/8" high Findlay onyx sugar shaker was of deep butterscotch glass with amber flowers, neck ribs with alternating light rose and ivory columns, and a period lid. The shaker was made circa 1889 by Dalzell, Gilmore & Leighton Co. of Findlay, Ohio, and sold for $2990 (est. $2000/3000).

The most expensive salt and pepper shakers were this set of 3 1/8" tall blue Aurene shakers of hexagonal form, with non-matching sterling period lids, attributed to Steuben Glass Works, 1912-22. The pair sold for $2760 (est. $500/800). Also from the Krauss collection, the set was published in Mildred and Ralph Lechner’s The World of Salt Shakers (1992).


Originally published in the September 2013 issue of Maine Antique Digest. © 2013 Maine Antique Digest

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